Archive for the ‘Medications’ Category

Advocacy Aids

May 16, 2011
 

Photo © Susannah Kay

I use the term Advocacy Aids to describe a set of health forms I’ve created to help you excel as your pet’s medical advocate. Where can you find them?  It’s easy.  Simply go to www.speakingforspot.com and look for “Resources” in the red horizontal main menu.  The first item in the Resources pull down menu is Advocacy Aids.  I invite you to download, print, copy, and use them to your heart’s content.  Feel free to share with others as well.  By the way, while you’re there  please check out my new website! 

The Advocacy Aids include: 

Health History Form:  This form provides an easy way to keep track of your pet’s vaccinations, test results, prior medical issues, surgical procedures, and adverse reactions to medications or vaccinations. 

Current Medications:  List all of your pet’s current medications (including supplements, flea and tick control products, and heartworm preventive).  Be sure to bring along a copy to every hospital visit. Your vet will be profoundly grateful and this paperwork will help you both catch any prescription errors. 

Current Health Issues:  This form helps keep track of all of your pet’s current medical issues.  It’s helpful to maintain a written list so none of the issues will be overlooked or forgotten. 

Medication and Treatment Schedule:  This template is wonderfully helpful if your pet requires medications/treatments multiple times daily and/or at different times of day.  I’ve provided you with the same template we use when treating animals in my hospital.  On my website you will find a sample template form that I’ve filled out (so you can see how it works) as well as a blank template for your use. 

Emergency Contact Information:  You will want to have ready access to this completed form in order to avoid spending time tracking down necessary information while in the midst of an emergency. Be sure to provide a copy to the person caring for your pets when you are away. 

Contingency Plan: Use this form when you are going out of town and may not be one hundred percent reachable.  The form lets your veterinarian know which trusted person you’ve designated to make medical decisions about your pet should you not be reachable.  Distribute a signed copy to your pet-sitter/boarding facility and your veterinarian. 

Veterinary Office Visit:  This form will help you keep track of the purpose of your visit as well as important questions to ask your veterinarian. 

For those of you with pets other than dogs, please forgive me as many of the forms contain the word, “dog”.  Feel free to cross this word out and substitute in any species you like!  After you’ve had a look at the Advocacy Aids, please let me know which ones you like and think you will use.  If you can think of other Advocacy Aids, please don’t be shy.  I would love to hear your ideas. 

Best wishes for good health, 

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year Award
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

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Canine arthritis: Symptoms and treatment options for arthritis in dogs

December 6, 2010

While I’m busy recovering from some back surgery, you have the good fortune of reading posts from some of my favorite doggie bloggers!  Today’s post comes from Dr. Lorie Huston who blogs regularly at Examiner.com.   Please make her feel welcome by posting your wonderful comments.  Be back soon! 

Best wishes,

Dr. Nancy Kay

Canine arthritis: Symptoms and treatment of arthritis in dogs
Canine arthritis is a common and painful disease for affected dogs.

Canine arthritis is also commonly referred to as degenerative joint disease. Arthritis in dogs can have many causes. It may be:

  • caused by a congenital deformity in the affected joint, as in hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia
  • caused by a previous injury
  • caused by aging and the resultant “wear and tear” on the affected joint
  • caused by infectious agents, such as Lyme disease
  • caused by autoimmune disorders

Symptoms of canine arthritis

Whatever the cause of arthritis, degenerative joint disease in dogs causes pain in the affected joint. Arthritis may affect any joint in the body, including hips, knees, elbows, shoulders, and spines. Arthritis may involve many joints or may affect only one joint.

Symptoms commonly seen with arthritis are related to pain in the affected joint and may include:

  • an abnormal gait (i.e. limping or carrying the painful leg)
  • stiffness
  • difficulty going up and down stairs or climbing into cars, onto furniture, etc.
  • difficulty finding a comfortable way to rest or lie
  • difficulty rising from a sleeping or seated position
  • lack of appetite
  • irritability

Treatment of arthritis in dogs

Treatment of arthritis in dogs may involve many different tactics. The immediate objective in treating arthritis is to decrease the pain associated with arthritis, which is often done through the use of pain relief medications. However, there are many other things which may also be recommended to improve the joint health of dogs suffering from arthritis.

Weight control is important for arthritic dogs

For those arthritic dogs which are overweight or obese, weight control should be a top priority. Besides adding additional weight to diseased joints leading to increased pain, fat as a tissue is increasingly being recognized as a secretory organ which produces substances which may in themselves contribute to causing pain. By reducing the weight of an arthritic dog, if appropriate, joint-related pain may become easier to manage.

Pain control for arthritic dogs

There are numerous pain control medications available for dogs with arthritis, including numerous NSAIDS (such as Rimadyl, Etogesic, Deramaxx, Metacam, Previcox and others) as well as medications such as tramadol, gabapentin and amantadine.

Cortisone or steroid products, such as prednisone, prednisolone or dexamethasone, are sometimes used to control the pain associated with arthritis under certain circumstances as well. These medications do have side effects and should be used as directed by the veterinarian. NSAIDs are contra-indicated when these products are being administered.

Nutraceuticals and other medications which may improve joint health

Various dietary supplements have been identified which may help to improve the health of affected joints, thereby easing the symptoms of arthritis. These supplements, also known as nutriceuticals, include:

  • glucosamine
  • chondroitin
  • omega-3 fatty acids
  • Methyl-sulfonyl-methane (MSM)

Pet owners should use caution in choosing nutriceuticals for their pets, however and should deal only with reputable drug manufacturers. Nutriceuticals are not regulated as most other pharmaceutical medications are in the United States and there have been many instances of labelling discrepancies with some of these medications.

Adequan is another medication which is often used to help improve the health of an arthritic joint. Adequan is an injectable medication which contains a protective cartilage component known as polysulfated glycosaminoglycan. Adequan has been used with success in relieving pain for some dogs with arthritis and other forms of degenerative joint disease.

Alternative medicine options for relief of arthritis pain in dogs

Acupuncture is being used more commonly to relieve the pain associated with arthritis in dogs and may an alternative in some communities where the services are readily available.

Physical rehabilitation is also becoming more widely used to control chronic pain such as that seen with arthritis as well. Physical therapy may range from modalities such as laser therapy or hydrotherapy to range-of-motion exercises which loosen and strengthen injured muscles, tendons and joints.

Adult stem cell therapy in treating canine arthritis

Stem cell therapy is another treatment option which is showing promise in the treatment of canine arthritis. Adult stem cell therapy has been used for several years as a treatment for muscle, joint and tendon injuries in horses and has more recently become available as a treatment option for dogs with similar injuries or diseases.

Multi-modal treatment approach to treating canine arthritis

In most cases of joint pain and arthritis in dogs, a multi-modal approach which incorporates one or more of the available treatment modalities is advisable. Weight loss for those dogs which are overweight is essential and may in itself provide some pain relief. Nutriceuticals may be used to help improve joint health and provide long-term pain relief. In the shorter term, pain medications or other options, such as acupuncture, may provide more immediate relief from pain. Physical therapy may also be indicated to help keep otherwise unsued muscles strong and healthy.

Dr. Lorie Huston

http://www.examiner.com/pet-health-in-national/canine-arthritis-symptoms-and-treatment-options-for-arthritis-dogs

Lorie Huston currently works as a small animal veterinarian in Providence, dealing primarily with dogs and cats. She has been practicing veterinary medicine since 1986. Lorie is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Rhode Island Veterinary Medical Association and the Veterinary Information Network. She also does a large amount of work for the Volunteer Services for Animals, a non-profit local group dedicated to helping pet owners and their pets. Lorie has been writing online since 2001. She has published numerous articles to various E-zines and newsletters, as well as providing news material to PRWeb. Currently, she is also writing for Ehow.com and Suite101.com.

_____________________________________________________

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller. 

Free Christmas or Chanukah gift wrap with books purchased between now and December 25th (www.speakingforspot.com/purchase.html).

Finding the Cure for Drug Delivery Ills

November 29, 2010

While I’m busy recovering from some back surgery, you have the good fortune of reading posts from some of my favorite doggie bloggers!  Today’s post comes from Dr. Patty Khuly whose writes the Fully Vetted blog at www.petmd.com/blogs/fullyvetted.  Please make her feel welcome by posting your wonderful comments.  Be back soon! 

Best wishes,

Dr. Nancy Kay

Getting pets to pop their pills is a huge issue. So huge, in fact, that a drug’s delivery method often informs veterinary decision making, sometimes more than the drug’s other properties. Side effects, for example, matter far less when the alternative is no treatment at all.

 

The “drug delivery” issue is getting more play recently, what with the growing list of drugs we’re now prescribing for our patients. This, coupled with issues of accessibility, availability and price fuels a sizable niche industry created specifically to meet the needs of pets who won’t — or can’t — tolerate drugs and supplements designed to treat and/or prevent their ills. After all, pets can be picky about what we put in their mouths or mix into their meals. And you would be too if you didn’t understand why you needed to take that multivitamin, glucosamine, or fatty acid gelcap on a daily basis.

This is why compounding pharmacies exist. For the modern veterinarian, being able to access our favorite compounding pharmacy’s expertise in the formulation of new versions of the same-old drugs that line our shelves is a boon to our profession. But few veterinary clients fully understand what it is our compounding pharmacies do for us. To help unmuddy the waters, here’s a brief list of how these places help us bring better care to our patients:

1. Delivery, delivery, delivery

As for the real estate and location truism, so too does the veterinary drug industry rely on the “D” word.

As a pet owner, you know how it is. We try everything to get meds into our pets. Some of us hide our pets’ pills in foodstuffs or treats: cream cheese, peanut butter (chunky works best, IMO), ham, chicken breast, pill pockets, filet mignon …

As veterinarians, we also do whatever it takes to get the meds into our patients. And, yes, sometimes it takes a lot of trial and error.

More than anything else, what we all want is a cure that requires no daily discomfort, wriggling, stressing, in-the-towel-burrito-ing or the potential for biting, scratching or generalized inter-species strife. This is where the compounding pharmacy comes in with their ability to turn…

a.    chalky to chewy
b.    bitter to tasty
c.    oral to topical

Yes, topical. So it is that sometimes compounding pharmacies can manage the seemingly impossible.

2. Availability

Is your drug on back-order? Discontinued? Supply chain hassles? Never fear. You don’t have to compromise your pet’s care if you can find a compounding pharmacy willing to make it for you. That’s what lots of veterinarians are doing now with drugs like ophthalmic cyclosporine. When the supply goes dry, compounding pharmacies’ production ramps up.

3. Safety

I’m not big on doing chemotherapy in-house. I’d always rather send my patients to the specialists where the required drugs are more safely housed. Yet I have plenty of clients who prefer that I administer these drugs personally, citing their pets’ greater comfort in a place they already know well.

This is where compounding pharmacies come in. They’ll ship pre-measured doses to me, already in their syringes and ready to inject. Safer for me, my staff, and my patients.

4. Convenience

Want your meds shipped directly to you? Your vet can arrange for that. Pharmacies will ship monthly, on cue, if that’s what you need.

It’s hard to quantify, but we suspect that non-compliance resulting from an inability to administer meds is among the biggest drivers of poor clinical outcomes in veterinary medicine (if not the biggest). Then there’s the issue of antibiotic resistance to deal with when antibiotics are started. The pill is found under the sofa … started again … spit out again … repeat …

Given this setup, is it any wonder that compounding pharmacies are finding veterinary medicine a lucrative place to invest their time and money?

But the take-home message here is not about building new businesses with our pet-dedicated dollars; it’s more about the willingness to meet our pets’ needs by making medications work through any means necessary.

Trouble is, clients don’t always inform us when the meds aren’t going down the gullet. Not every pet owner is educated enough about drug choices to know they can ask us for alternatives. And, truth be told, we don’t always pointedly ask whether an unhappy outcome might be the result of poor drug compliance. (It just seems kind of rude to ask, you know?)

However, now that you’ve read this, you know what you need to do. When you come across a tidy stack of tablets your dog has hidden under the bed, or your cat drools for hours after taking her pill, consider asking for another method. No one needs to suffer when so many other options are available.

Dr. Patty Khuly

www.petmd.com/blogs/fullyvetted

Patty Khuly VMD, MBA is a small animal veterinarian in Miami, Florida, where she practices medicine at Sunset Animal Clinic and serves on the board of the South Florida Veterinary Medical Association. She is a graduate of Wellesley College, the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, and The Wharton School of Business.

_____________________________________________________

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller. 

Free Christmas or Chanukah guft wrap with books purchased between now and December 25th (www.speakingforspot.com/purchase.html).

Fish Oil (Omega-3 Fatty Acids): a Proven Treatment for Canine Arthritis

January 30, 2010

 I had the good fortune of receiving my veterinary school training at Cornell University.  Part of what made this education so fabulous was that the senior faculty spent a great deal of “face time” with their students.  I have fond memories of a seasoned clinician patiently holding a Dachshund for me while teaching this novice how to collect a blood sample from the jugular vein.  Another taught this city slicker how to collect a milk sample for mastitis testing from the teat of a cow.   A major “take home point” my classmates and I received from these icons in veterinary medicine was, “First, do no harm.”  In other words, before subjecting our patients to diagnostic testing or treatment, we should strive to be as confident as possible that the potential for benefit was far greater than the potential for harm.  “First do no harm” has always been my mantra and is the main reason I try to rely on “evidence based medicine” (facts substantiated by research) rather than anecdotal information to support what I do. 

Unfortunately, there is a paucity of evidence based medicine pertaining to the use of many commonly used supplements, nutraceuticals, and herbs for dogs and cats.  This is the reason a big smile appeared on my face when I opened a recent edition of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.  It contained two studies on the effects of omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (also known as arthritis or degenerative joint disease) in dogs.  The study designs were excellent in that many dogs were included, there was a control group (some dogs received a placebo rather than the fatty acids), and the observers were “blinded”- neither the veterinarians nor the dogs’ families knew if the dogs were receiving the fatty acids or the placebo.  

Fish Oil (Omega-3 Fatty Acids)Here’s what the studies showed.  Compared to the placebo group, the dogs receiving omega-3 fatty acids had a significantly improved ability to rise from a resting position and play by six weeks after beginning supplementation, and improved ability to walk by 12 weeks.  Additionally, compared to the control group, dogs receiving the fish oil had improved weight bearing on the affected limbs as assessed by force-plate analysis (an extremely humane testing method).  No significant adverse side effects from the fish oil supplementation were reported. 

If you’ve spent any significant amount of time with dogs (especially large dogs), guaranteed you’ve known at least a few with arthritis.  It is estimated to affect up to twenty percent of dogs over one year of age. Dogs with arthritis resemble people with arthritis- they are often stiff and slow to rise when they first get up in the morning, as well as after vigorous exercise.  There are many ways to treat this common canine malady including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (the equivalent of ibuprofen for humans), acupuncture, rehabilitation therapy, and supplements that increase the production of normal joint fluid.  The effectiveness of all of these modalities, including fish oil, will vary from individual to individual.  The beauty of fish oil is that, likely the only potential significant risk is for you- your dog may develop fish breath! 

I love the fact that veterinarians now have evidence based support for recommending fish oil as a treatment for their canine patients with arthritis, and in doing so, they can abide by the mantra of, “First do no harm.”  If you suspect your dog has arthritis (if you have a large breed dog over eight years of age, chances are that you do), talk with your veterinarian about the pros and cons of all the treatment options.  And the next time you are dining on fish, don’t be surprised if your dog’s nose appears right beside your dinner plate.  Chances are, your dog clearly recognizes the benefits of fish oil supplementation!  Now, pass the salmon please. 

Wishing you and your four-legged family members abundant good health.

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller. 

Order  a copy of Speaking for Spot personally signed by Dr. Kay – http://www.speakingforspot.com/purchase.html

Join our email list – http://speakingforspot.com/joinemaillist.html

Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Listen to Dr. Kay’s interview – A Veterinarian Advises “How to Speak for Spot” on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross

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Get Out Your Reading Glasses!

November 25, 2009

When was the last time you took a close look at your pet’s prescription medication label?  Would you be surprised to know that, by law, the label is required to include twelve different informational items? Have a look at this mandatory dozen and see if every single one of them appears on your pet’s prescription label.

Speaking for Spot's advice on reading your pet's medication labels

1.   Date the medication was prescribed

2.   Your pet’s name

3.   Your name

4.   The prescribing veterinarian’s name

5.   Address and telephone number of the facility filling the prescription

6.   Amount of medication dispensed (milliliters, ounces, number of tablets or capsules)

7.   Strength of the medication (milligrams, micrograms)

8.   Dosage and duration of treatment

9.   Route of administration (orally, applied to the skin, in the ear)

10.  Number of refills

11.  Cautionary instructions (“shake well,” “keep refrigerated,” “don’t let your dog drive”)

12.  Expiration date 

After performing this exercise, please let me know what you learned, other than, that’s one heck of a lot of information for such a tiny label?  It’s no wonder I need my reading glasses! 

Wishing you and your four-legged family members abundant good health,

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller. 

Speaking for Spot, signed by Dr. Kay, a great gift idea for holiday 2009 shoppingOrder  a copy of Speaking for Spot personally signed by Dr. Kay – http://www.speakingforspot.com/purchase.html

Join our email list – http://speakingforspot.com/joinemaillist.html

Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Listen to Dr. Kay’s interview – A Veterinarian Advises “How to Speak for Spot” on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross

Medical Alert for Those Caring for a Diabetic Dog or Cat

November 7, 2009

If your four-legged family member is diabetic and the insulin product you are administering is Vetsulin®, please pay close attention.  The FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine is alerting veterinarians that problems with this product are being reported. Apparently, as Vetsulin® sits in storage, the crystalline zinc crystal component (which is supposed to comprise 70% of the solution; the remaining 30% is the insulin) can increase above 70%.  This leads to a slower onset of action of the insulin and, potentially a longer duration of action both of which can result in unpredictable fluctuations in blood glucose values (values that are too high or too low). 

The manufacturer of Vetsulin®, Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health is unable to assure the FDA that each batch of their product is stable.  This company, along with the FDA have requested that veterinarians closely monitor their patients receiving Vetsulin®.  

There is absolutely no need to panic.  However, if your dog or cat is receiving this product, I strongly encourage you to discuss the following with your veterinarian: 

  1. Symptoms to be watching for that might indicate your pet’s blood glucose value is too high or too low
  2. Monitoring of blood glucose values
  3. Whether or not your pet should be transitioned to a different brand of insulin 

At the time of this writing, this problem has not been addressed on the Internet/Schering-Plough Web site (www.vetsulin.com) but I expect information will soon be forthcoming.  

For more information about Vetsulin® concerns visit www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm188752.htm.

Wishing you and your four-legged family members good health,

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller. 

Join our email list – http://speakingforspot.com/joinemaillist.html

Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Listen to Dr. Kay’s interview – A Veterinarian Advises “How to Speak for Spot” on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross

Pain Management 101

September 4, 2009

My husband and I just returned from a wonderful stay at a dog-friendly campground. We encountered just about as many dogs as we did people! We made some new friends including Buddy, Sierra, Milo, Otis, Judd, Lexie, and Homer (please don’t ask me to recall the names of their humans). Our next-door neighbors were Milo and Otis, two middle-aged black Labradors. When these goofy brothers weren’t off on family hikes they spent their time meandering about with sticks in their mouths and checking our campsite in case we managed to “misplace” any food items. By day three, I observed them to be exploring less and lying around more. I also noticed that Milo was favoring a front leg and Otis was showing discomfort in his hind end. When I mentioned my observations to our neighbors (I cannot seem to keep my mouth shut in such situations), they told me that Milo and Otis both have arthritis and their stiffness and soreness was predictable in response to their increased activity level. They routinely gave them pain medication (the equivalent of aspirin or ibuprofen for us) as soon as arthritis symptoms became apparent. In fact, they had administered their first dosage that morning. These poor folks had no idea that such innocent comments would prompt a mini-lecture from the likes of me! Here is what I explained:

Whether for ourselves or for our pets, the ideal time to treat predictable pain is before it begins. Investigational studies have documented that pain can induce a “kindling effect”. In other words, low-grade pain has the potential to self-ignite into a flare-up of pain that is more severe, therefore more difficult to control with medication. Far better to take proactive measures (medication, acupuncture, rehabilitation therapy, glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, etc.) before the onset of predictable or anticipated pain than it is to attempt to douse the discomfort once it has already “caught fire”. It’s also important to keep in mind that many dogs, particularly those with stoic demeanors, may not demonstrate any overt symptoms until their pain has progressed well beyond what would be considered mild.

I suspect that my new friends Milo and Otis will be far more comfortable on their future camping trips! I must confess here- I also counseled their humans on the benefits of weight loss (both dogs were chubby) as a means of benefiting their arthritis pain. Those poor people certainly got more than they bargained for! Does your dog predictably become stiff or sore following increased activity? If so, please share what you do to prevent the discomfort.

Now, here’s wishing you and your four-legged best friend good health! 

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller. 

Join our email list – http://speakingforspot.com/joinemaillist.html

Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Listen to Dr. Kay’s interview – A Veterinarian Advises “How to Speak for Spot” on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross

A “First” in Veterinary Medicine

August 10, 2009

Diagnosing and treating canine and feline cancer is part of the daily routine for most veterinary specialists.  In fact, I’ve guesstimated that 75 percent of the patients I care for have cancer. Depending on which source you read (and believe) as many as 50 percent of our companion animals will develop cancer at some point during their lives.  Depressing stuff, I know, but perhaps this is why I’m particularly excited about a new drug called Palladia, recently introduced by Pfizer Animal Health. 

Palladia (toceranib phosphate) is the very first drug ever developed specifically for the treatment of cancer in dogs.  We are using it to treat a common type of canine cancer called mast cell disease.  Mast cells normally function in the body as part of the immune system.  In fact, they are the cells primarily responsible for producing allergic reactions.  Just as with other types of tumors, mast cell cancer develops when these cells proliferate in an unregulated fashion. Palladia is being used to treat dogs with mast cell tumors within the skin (where they most commonly arise) that cannot be cured surgically.  The drug works directly at the level of the cancer cell and interferes with blood flow to the tumor. 

Palladia is an exciting, new treatment option for dogs with mast cell tumors.  I’m pleased that, for the first time, an effective cancer-fighting medication has been developed specifically for the veterinary profession. Please let me know if your dog happens to have mast cell cancer.  I will be happy to provide you with more details about treatment options.

Now, here’s wishing you and your four-legged best friend good health! 

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller. 

Join our email list – http://speakingforspot.com/joinemaillist.html

Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Listen to Dr. Kay’s interview – A Veterinarian Advises “How to Speak for Spot” on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross –

The Lowdown on Nutritional Supplements

July 6, 2009

The nutritional supplement industry has become big business as people are looking for more natural ways to care for the health of their pets.  For example, a person might be inclined to try glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate for their dog’s arthritis pain rather than a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication (the equivalent of doggie Advil).

The number of nutritional supplement manufacturers has grown exponentially.  Unfortunately, the quality of products hitting the market is somewhat hit or miss.  There is no FDA approval process for nutritional supplements, and incidents of contamination with heavy metals, pesticides, or other unsavory ingredients have been reported.  Additionally manufacturers are not required to comply with specific formulations for their products- the strength or concentration of the active ingredient may be inadequate, too much of a good thing, or just right.

Knowing this, how in the world can the average consumer purchase a product that is safe and effective?  Certainly query your vet for his or her recommendations.  We veterinarians are taught to use the ACCLAIM system (described below) to assess nutritional supplements.   You too can use this system to make educated choices about these products for yourself and your four-legged loved ones.

A = A name you recognize.  Choose an established company that provides educational materials for veterinarians and other consumers.  Is it a company that is well established?

C = Clinical experience.  Companies that support clinical research and have their products used in clinical trials that are published in peer-reviewed journals to which veterinarians have access are more likely to have a quality product.

C = Contents.  All ingredients should be clearly indicated on the product label.

L = Label claims.  Label claims that sound too good to be true likely are.  Choose products with realistic label claims.

A = Administration recommendations.  Dosing instructions should be accurate and easy to follow.  It should be easy to calculate the amount of active ingredient administered per dose per day.

I = Identification of lot.  A lot identification number indicates that a surveillance system exists to ensure product quality.

M = Manufacturer information.  Basic company information should be clearly stated on the label including a website (that is up and running) or some other means of contacting customer support.

Wishing you and your four-legged family members good health,

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

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Listen to Dr. Kay’s interview – A Veterinarian Advises “How to Speak for Spot” on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross –