Posts Tagged ‘rescue organizations’

Puppy Mill Awareness Day – September 17, 2011

September 10, 2011

Photo Credit: Susannah Kay

Heads up everyone! This Saturday, September 17th is Puppy Mill Awareness Day.  I’ve spent plenty of time on my soapbox in an uproar about puppy mills  and I will continue to do so until I no longer have to witness the physical maladies, behavioral nightmares, and broken hearts created by those who profit from the mass production of puppies.

Puppy Mill Awareness Day is all about educating as many people as possible about the inhumanity and insanity of puppy mills.  Might you know someone who is thinking about adopting a puppy?  If so please counsel them on the importance of avoiding an impulsive pet store purchase (guaranteed the “livestock” there were born at puppy mills).  Also, teach them that purchasing a pup online, sight (and site) unseen just about guarantees they will be providing income to a puppy mill. Rather, encourage them to adopt from a rescue organization, shelter, or reputable breeder.

About the only thing that keeps me sane when it comes to puppy millers are those wonderful souls who reside at the opposite end of the human spectrum- namely those who work in shelters and rescue organizations because they are passionate about giving animals a second chance.  As a way of honoring these folks and “celebrating” Puppy Mill Awareness Day, I hope you’ll help me out with the following plan.  Please tell me about your favorite rescue or humane organization and why you believe it is special.  Provide me with the group’s email address and contact information. From the list of responses I receive I will choose 10 organizations to receive a free copy of Speaking for Spot  and when I mail the book to them, I will let them know it was a gift from you (so be sure to include your full name).  Thanks ever so much.

Now get out there and spread some puppy mill awareness!

Best wishes for good health,

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year Award
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

 

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Dog Auctions

January 12, 2011

I wish I were a fiction writer and the details within this blog were simply a product of my imagination.  Unfortunately dog auctions are a painful and despicable fact of life. As much as I dislike crafting blogs that are “downers” I’ve recognized the importance of educating as many people as I can about animal-related issues that undermine our humanity.  Dog auctions certainly fit the bill.  

 

In case you are unfamiliar with dog auctions let me fill you in.  Envision rooms filled floor to ceiling with crates and cages each housing dogs whose sole purpose in life is to make puppies.  Every dog in the room is identified by the number on the auction tag hanging round his or her neck. There are purebreds of multiple varieties although some might not be recognizable as such given their lack of health care and horrifically overgrown hair coats. And, of course, there are plenty of “designer hybrids” the mutts that are purposefully planned because they are “all the rage” and their litters will garner thousands of dollars.  One would think these rooms filled with dogs would be chaotic and noisy.  In fact the quiet is eerie; these are dogs with broken spirits- too scared to vocally protest and too disassociated from their miserable existences to invite attention from the humans peering into their cages. 

 

Six auctions are held every year in Farmerstown, Ohio.  In fact the next one is later this week on January 15th.  If you happen to live near Farmerstown, I encourage you to attend.  You will be surrounded by puppy mill proprietors who have come to socialize, discuss their trade, and buy and sell “livestock”. There will also be some representatives from breed rescue organizations, hoping to place some winning bids that will alter the dismal fate of as many dogs as is affordable.  Don’t take a camera with you- it will be confiscated.  You see, these are rather covert affairs- journalists and photographers are not allowed.  The photographic images accompanying this blog were obtained via an undercover operation.  At the upcoming Ohio auction 463 dogs are slated to be auctioned.  The dogs bringing the highest prices will be those with proven fertility records; already pregnant bitches are highly valued.  Details about each dog’s breeding behavior and previous litter sizes are provided, but information about basic temperament or breed-specific inherited diseases within the family tree will be   unavailable. 

  

 

 
If you attend an auction in Ohio, be sure to look for and meet Mary O’Connor-Shaver.  You will find her at the peaceful protest that is a visible presence on each and every auction day.  In my mind Mary is a hero, working tirelessly to convince Ohio legislators to ban dog auctions from her state.  I hope you will visit her website www.BanOhioDogAuctions.com.  Mary has been a huge source of information and inspiration for me.  

What can you do to help eradicate dog auctions and put an end to puppy mills?  Here are some suggestions:

1. Boycott puppy mills.  This means never ever purchasing a puppy from a pet store or from an on line source (site and sight unseen).  Visit your local shelter (a surprising number of purebred dogs wind up there) and contact local breed-specific rescue organizations.  If you decide to purchase a puppy from a breeder please take the time to read my article titled “A Dozen Simple Ways To Be Certain You Are Working With a Reputable Breeder” (http://speakingforspot.com/blog/?p=749).
2. If you live in a state that sanctions dog auctions (Ohio, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arkansas, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri) write your legislators and appeal to them to stop this madness.  And if there are efforts within your state to create legislation banning dog auctions, please pitch in.  This might involve organizing rallies, writing letters, and gathering signatures of support.
3. If you don’t reside in a state that sanctions dog auctions, write letters to the governors and legislators of the eight states that do.  Let them know you will no longer support their state in terms of travel and commerce until their dog auctions cease to exist.
4. Let your veterinarian know how you feel about dog auctions and puppy mills, and encourage him or her to take a public stance against them.  Goodness knows, they see first hand the horrific health issues and accompanying heartbreak produced by puppy mills.
5. If you are a teacher, educate your students about puppy mills and dog auctions.  Teach them about responsible ways to adopt a dog.  I firmly believe that educating children about these issues is the key success.
6. Please share this blog with anyone and everyone you know who loves a dog, and encourage them to take action. 

My youngest child attends college in Athens, Ohio.  During a recent Parents Weekend visit my husband, daughter and I checked out Petland, the pet store in Athens. We found no fewer than three dozen utterly adorable purebred and designer hybrid puppies- undoubtedly puppy mill progeny.  There were plenty of customers in the store that day interacting with the pups and contemplating adoption. I chatted with the store manager about the Boxer pup on display and asked to see the paperwork documenting if Boxer cardiomyopathy existed in the pup’s family tree.  Boxer cardiomyopathy is an inherited heart condition that prematurely ends the lives of afflicted dogs.  She responded by saying, “No, we don’t have that paperwork but no problem because Petland guarantees full refunds on any dogs that develop symptoms caused by an inherited disease.” No problem for Petland that is…….. 

What are you willing to do to help stop this madness? 

Best wishes, 

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook  

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

Home for the Holidays: let's make some magic!

December 4, 2010

While I’m busy recovering from some back surgery, you have the good fortune of reading posts from some of my favorite doggie bloggers!  Today’s post comes from Dr. Jessica Vogelsang (“Dr. V”) who blogs regularly at www.pawcurious.com.   Please make her feel welcome by posting your wonderful comments.  Be back soon! 

Best wishes,

Dr. Nancy Kay

Note:  Dr. V’s article appeared on her blog in early November at the start of her one week campaign to generate food donations for shelters through The Iams Pets In Need program.  Her one week campaig generated 45,700 meals!  You can check out the results at http://www.pawcurious.com/2010/11/happy-surprises-part-one/ .  While her campaign is completed you can still earn food donations for shelters through the links provided.

——————–

I despise the week between Christmas and New Years.

Why? Because without fail, I see piles upon piles of new holiday pets. Pets from pet stores, whose owners overpaid for them and can then not afford to treat them for the parasites, distemper, or congenital disease they all too often wind up with. It happens every year.

In 1999, Mike Arms at The Helen Woodward Animal Center decided to change that. With 14 local shelters, they launched the “Home for the Holidays” campaign to encourage people to adopt a pet instead of buying one.

To say that it was a success is a bit of an understatement. Since its modest beginnings in 1999, Home 4 the Holidays has seen the placement of 4.6 million pets, including dogs, cats, rabbits, reptiles, and birds. It has grown from 14 Southern California shelters to over 3,500 animal organizations in over 21 countries.

Helen Woodward has partnered with Iams to make this program a worldwide movement. This year’s goal is to adopt 1.5 million animals and donate 5 million bowls of food to shelters in need. You can help make this a reality! Here’s how:
1. Adopt a pet in need and/or encourage others to do so.

Even if you aren’t ready to adopt a pet yourself, I bet you know someone who is. Someone who has mentioned they are looking for a dog/cat/ferret/whatever. You’d be surprised how many people are still not aware that the shelters and rescues are overflowing with puppies, kittens, purebreds, and whatever it is they think they won’t find there.

Petfinder is one of my favorite sites in the whole world and I still meet people every day who had no idea it exists.

2. Leave a comment here. (You can still donate to the Feed Pets in Need program by visiting  http://www.iams.com/RescuePet/FeedPetsInNeed.aspx)

Seriously. It’s that simple. Comment on this post and Iams will donate 25 meals to a shelter in need. Any comment counts. Tell your friends, tell your Facebook buddies- we have ONE WEEK to drive this as high as we can. My goal between now and November 8th is 400 comments. Can I do it? Can we do it? I need your help!!

3. Post a picture on my Facebook page to generate FIFTY meals. (You can still donate to the Feed Pets in Need program by visiting  http://www.iams.com/RescuePet/FeedPetsInNeed.aspx)

•“Like” Iams on Facebook.
•Go to the pawcurious Facebook fan page.
•Upload a picture of your pet with a caption that says what your pet is most curious about. Get it? curious?
•Make sure the picture is tagged with @Iams to select their page. That tag is what will generate the 50 meal donation.
•To sweeten the pot I will pick one picture from this group to receive a prize. Don’t ask me what since I don’t know what it will be yet, but it will be a prize and it will be delightful.
Easy, right? Can I count on you guys to help me get 400 comments this week?

Dr. V – Pawcurious

Dr. V is a small animal veterinarian.  After a brief and feverish attempt to throw 8 years of college out the window and become something else entirely, the dogs won her over. They always do. She decided to start a blog about her pets and the veterinary field after I realized just how many people are interested in the odd little vignettes that make up her day, both in and out of the vet clinic.

You can still donate to the Feed Pets in Need program by visiting  http://www.iams.com/RescuePet/FeedPetsInNeed.aspx

Dr. V’s promotion through her website was a 1 week campaign in early November. 

_____________________________________________________

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller. 

Free Christmas or Chanukah gift wrap with books purchased between now and December 25th (www.speakingforspot.com/purchase.html).

Home for the Holidays: let’s make some magic!

December 4, 2010

While I’m busy recovering from some back surgery, you have the good fortune of reading posts from some of my favorite doggie bloggers!  Today’s post comes from Dr. Jessica Vogelsang (“Dr. V”) who blogs regularly at www.pawcurious.com.   Please make her feel welcome by posting your wonderful comments.  Be back soon! 

Best wishes,

Dr. Nancy Kay

Note:  Dr. V’s article appeared on her blog in early November at the start of her one week campaign to generate food donations for shelters through The Iams Pets In Need program.  Her one week campaig generated 45,700 meals!  You can check out the results at http://www.pawcurious.com/2010/11/happy-surprises-part-one/ .  While her campaign is completed you can still earn food donations for shelters through the links provided.

——————–

I despise the week between Christmas and New Years.

Why? Because without fail, I see piles upon piles of new holiday pets. Pets from pet stores, whose owners overpaid for them and can then not afford to treat them for the parasites, distemper, or congenital disease they all too often wind up with. It happens every year.

In 1999, Mike Arms at The Helen Woodward Animal Center decided to change that. With 14 local shelters, they launched the “Home for the Holidays” campaign to encourage people to adopt a pet instead of buying one.

To say that it was a success is a bit of an understatement. Since its modest beginnings in 1999, Home 4 the Holidays has seen the placement of 4.6 million pets, including dogs, cats, rabbits, reptiles, and birds. It has grown from 14 Southern California shelters to over 3,500 animal organizations in over 21 countries.

Helen Woodward has partnered with Iams to make this program a worldwide movement. This year’s goal is to adopt 1.5 million animals and donate 5 million bowls of food to shelters in need. You can help make this a reality! Here’s how:
1. Adopt a pet in need and/or encourage others to do so.

Even if you aren’t ready to adopt a pet yourself, I bet you know someone who is. Someone who has mentioned they are looking for a dog/cat/ferret/whatever. You’d be surprised how many people are still not aware that the shelters and rescues are overflowing with puppies, kittens, purebreds, and whatever it is they think they won’t find there.

Petfinder is one of my favorite sites in the whole world and I still meet people every day who had no idea it exists.

2. Leave a comment here. (You can still donate to the Feed Pets in Need program by visiting  http://www.iams.com/RescuePet/FeedPetsInNeed.aspx)

Seriously. It’s that simple. Comment on this post and Iams will donate 25 meals to a shelter in need. Any comment counts. Tell your friends, tell your Facebook buddies- we have ONE WEEK to drive this as high as we can. My goal between now and November 8th is 400 comments. Can I do it? Can we do it? I need your help!!

3. Post a picture on my Facebook page to generate FIFTY meals. (You can still donate to the Feed Pets in Need program by visiting  http://www.iams.com/RescuePet/FeedPetsInNeed.aspx)

•“Like” Iams on Facebook.
•Go to the pawcurious Facebook fan page.
•Upload a picture of your pet with a caption that says what your pet is most curious about. Get it? curious?
•Make sure the picture is tagged with @Iams to select their page. That tag is what will generate the 50 meal donation.
•To sweeten the pot I will pick one picture from this group to receive a prize. Don’t ask me what since I don’t know what it will be yet, but it will be a prize and it will be delightful.
Easy, right? Can I count on you guys to help me get 400 comments this week?

Dr. V – Pawcurious

Dr. V is a small animal veterinarian.  After a brief and feverish attempt to throw 8 years of college out the window and become something else entirely, the dogs won her over. They always do. She decided to start a blog about her pets and the veterinary field after I realized just how many people are interested in the odd little vignettes that make up her day, both in and out of the vet clinic.

You can still donate to the Feed Pets in Need program by visiting  http://www.iams.com/RescuePet/FeedPetsInNeed.aspx

Dr. V’s promotion through her website was a 1 week campaign in early November. 

_____________________________________________________

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller. 

Free Christmas or Chanukah gift wrap with books purchased between now and December 25th (www.speakingforspot.com/purchase.html).

Speaking for Spot Gives Back

May 9, 2010

Wonderfully fun names such as “A New Leash on Life,” “Wags to Riches,” and “Fairy Dogmother Rescue,” are to be found at PetFinder.com. This is definitely the place to go in cyberspace when thinking about adopting a new pet.  Before I go one step further, rest assured I am aware that the PetFinder site likely features some puppy mills amongst their gazillions of legitimate nonprofit organizations.  I’ve no doubt that in spite of the fact that PetFinder performs their due diligence, some puppy mills likely slip through the cracks.  In my mind, this does not detract from the profoundly positive outcomes PetFinder facilitates.  Rather, it means that we need to perform our own due diligence when using this website.

At the time of this writing, PetFinder features 13,184 nonprofit adoption groups (shelters, humane societies, SPCA’s, and rescue organizations) and over 297,457 pets in need of a new home. PetFinder states that they’ve facilitated more than 13 million adoptions since 1995. Wow, that’s one heck of a lot of animals’ lives changed for the better!  I have a tremendous respect for the many thousands of people who invest their time, energy, and financial resources helping animals in need of a new lease on life.  Their generosity and desire to “give back” are inspirational.  I’ve initiated the Speaking for Spot Gives Back Program with hopes of providing a little bit of support for the amazing work they do. 

The Speaking for Spot Gives Back Program is open to all animal-centered nonprofits including service organizations and adoption and rescue groups.  Here’s how the program works.  Participating organizations appear on a pull down menu on the purchase page of my website (www.speakingforspot.com). When someone purchases Speaking for Spot they can designate which nonprofit organization will receive 20% of the book sale proceeds. The Speaking for Spot Gives Back Program is a win-win situation – not only will participating organizations raise much-needed funds, those who purchase the book will have a wonderful resource that will last a lifetime!

Please support your favorite animal-centered nonprofit organization by encouraging the folks who work there to learn more about the Speaking for Spot Gives Back Program.  They can either contact me directly (Dr.Kay@SpeakingforSpot.com) or visit http://www.speakingforspot.com/speakingforspotgivesback.html.  And when you are ready to expand your own menagerie, I hope you will begin the search at your local rescue organizations, shelters, and humane societies.  Have you already adopted from such an organization?  If so, I’d love to hear your story!

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health, 

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

A Rottweiler Reunion

March 28, 2010

If you’ve been following my blog for some time, you may remember a series of stories I posted about two pregnant Rottweilers that were abandoned at my veterinary hospital (www.speakingforspot.com/blog 2/20/09, 3/8/09, 3/17/09).  In fact, these girls were so darned pregnant that, within 24 hours, one of them, now named Mia, delivered ten healthy, happy puppies.  Mia and her little sausages were fostered by Jill, a member of the amazing team of receptionists at my hospital.   Jill ended up keeping the runt of the litter, now known as Dodger, and she managed to find wonderful homes for Mia and the other nine pups. Candy, the other mama, found her way to Linda, a Rottweiler maven who works tirelessly doing Rottie rescue work.  Candy delivered five pups while in Linda’s care.  Mama and all five pups were placed in caring homes.  

   

  

  

Jill has managed to keep tabs on Mia and all but one her puppies.  As the adoptive families report, they are all matches made in heaven!  At their recent one-year birthday reunion (held at a local dog park) the puppies were all playing while their humans were sporting grins from ear to ear!  Although there were thirty or so dogs at the park that day, the siblings seemed to hang out preferentially with one another.  Have a look at the “before” and “after” photos.  In the adult photos, there are clearly two distinct facial appearances. (Perhaps two different dads were involved in the creation of this litter!) Charlie, Bandit, and Giovani have kept their original names.  Abby, Delilah, Ember, Freda, Hans, Ivan, and Juno have become Maggie, Dee Dee, Dodger, Ava, Trixie, Bruno, and Sadie.    

Dodger is the dog furthest to the right in this photo

  

Those little sausages have all turned into massive dogs with weights varying from 80 to 110 pounds.  And guess who the 110 pounder is!  None other than Dodger, the original runt of the litter!  

I hope this blog makes you smile and reminds you to support your local animal rescue organizations.  

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health,  

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook  

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.  

A Rottweiler Reunion

March 27, 2010

If you’ve been following my blog for some time, you may remember a series of stories I posted about two pregnant Rottweilers that were abandoned at my veterinary hospital (www.speakingforspot.com/blog 2/20/09, 3/8/09, 3/17/09).  In fact, these girls were so darned pregnant that, within 24 hours, one of them, now named Mia, delivered ten healthy, happy puppies.  Mia and her little sausages were fostered by Jill, a member of the amazing team of receptionists at my hospital.   Jill ended up keeping the runt of the litter, now known as Dodger, and she managed to find wonderful homes for Mia and the other nine pups. Candy, the other mama, found her way to Linda, a Rottweiler maven who works tirelessly doing Rottie rescue work.  Candy delivered five pups while in Linda’s care.  Mama and all five pups were placed in caring homes. 

  

 

 

Jill has managed to keep tabs on Mia and all but one her puppies.  As the adoptive families report, they are all matches made in heaven!  At their recent one-year birthday reunion (held at a local dog park) the puppies were all playing while their humans were sporting grins from ear to ear!  Although there were thirty or so dogs at the park that day, the siblings seemed to hang out preferentially with one another.  Have a look at the “before” and “after” photos.  In the adult photos, there are clearly two distinct facial appearances. (Perhaps two different dads were involved in the creation of this litter!) Charlie, Bandit, and Giovani have kept their original names.  Abby, Delilah, Ember, Freda, Hans, Ivan, and Juno have become Maggie, Dee Dee, Dodger, Ava, Trixie, Bruno, and Sadie.   

Dodger is the dog furthest to the right in this photo

Those little sausages have all turned into massive dogs with weights varying from 80 to 110 pounds.  And guess who the 110 pounder is!  None other than Dodger, the original runt of the litter! 

I hope this blog makes you smile and reminds you to support your local animal rescue organizations. 

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health, 

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Magic!

March 17, 2009

Magic was an incredibly smart and affectionate Rottweiler mix lovingly cared for by Matt, Shannon and their two children.  Her final years were a challenge because of diabetes and blindness.  When the quality of Magic’s life dramatically diminished and there was no hope for improvement, Matt and Shannon opted for euthanasia. Magic passed away peacefully at my hospital while lying on her favorite blue and white checkered blanket, surrounded by her doting human family members. 

 

That was just a few months ago.  When I’ve spoken with Matt and Shannon since, it has been clear that Magic’s absence has created a huge void. They and their children are all experiencing and working through their grief a little bit differently. Not surprisingly they’ve had some debates about when to consider adopting another dog.  The kids are clearly ready- Matt and Shannon haven’t been so sure, that is until they received my email about two abandoned Rottweiler mamas and their 15 mixed breed puppies (see previous blog posts at http://www.speakingforspot.com), The photos that accompanied my description of the dogs were utterly compelling to them. Not only did the appearance of the mother remind them of their Magic, the blanket she and her pups were lying on happened to be the exact same blue and white checkered blanket they’d left at my hospital with their beloved girl (keep in mind, we have literally hundreds of blankets to choose from in our hospital)!

 

Needless to say, a quick family conference determined that a puppy visit was in order.  Now Matt, Shannon, and their kids have only a few more weeks to wait before Charlie- a plump little female with German Shepherd type markings- becomes part of their family.   What a lucky puppy!

 

Some refer to such interesting life events as synchronicity.  Deepak Chopra would likely refer to this story as a “divine coincidence.”  I prefer to think of it as Magic!

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Please visit www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. SPEAKING FOR SPOT is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.  
 

Wishing you and your dog good health,

 

Dr. Nancy Kay

Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

Look for us on Twitterhttp://twitter.com/speakingforspot

 

Mia, Candy, and Fifteen Puppies

March 8, 2009

It has now been two weeks since two pregnant Rottweilers were abandoned at my hospital (read Victims Come in All Sizes at Spot’s blog: speakingforspot.wordpress.com).  My blog post about these two girls generated so much interest about their welfare, I feel the need to provide an update.

 

Within days of having their lives turned upside down, one of the Rottweilers (now named Mia) gave birth to ten plump, vigorous, hungry puppies- six girls and four boys.  She and her pups are receiving foster care and living the good life with Jill (one of our hospital receptionists) and her family. Jill tells me that this has been an incredible and wonderful experience for her family.  They have fallen in love with Mia (they may have trouble letting her go) and watching the puppies change day by day has been extraordinary.  Mia is the “model mom,” nurturing her pups and welcoming the companionship of her new human family. The pups have just opened their eyes and are quickly developing different personalities.  Some are calm and unobtrusive while others have become pushy, persistently demanding their mama’s attention and pushing others out of the way to get it.  The pups are named (at least temporarily) Abby, Bandit, Charli, Delilah, Ember, Freda, Giovani, Hans, Ivan, and Juno.  A few look like Rottweilers- the others clearly have mixed breed markings.  To date, six of Mia’s pups are spoken for.

 

Candy and her puppies have found a safe haven with Rottweiler maven, Linda.  Like so many others who tirelessly invest their time and money into dog rescue work, Linda opens her home and heart to Rottweilers (or Rottweiler mixed breeds) who have experienced misfortune.  Linda reports that, in the course of adapting to so many changes, Candy’s somewhat timid demeanor is giving way to a more animated, tail-wagging personality. Like Mia, Candy is also a wonderful mother.  To date, none of her pups are spoken for.  There are three boys and two girls.

 

I continue to ponder what life must have been like for Mia and Candy before I met them and why the person who cared for them felt the need to make such a drastic life-changing decision.  What I do know is that, from here on out, life is bound to be wonderful for these two gorgeous mothers and their fifteen babies.  If you have interest in adopting a Rottweiler mix pup (they’ll be ready to leave the nest in approximately 5 weeks), please contact me at dr.kay@speakingforspot.com.

 

 

Please visit www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. SPEAKING FOR SPOT is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Wishing you and your dog good health,
Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

 

Victims Come in All Sizes

February 20, 2009

As I was hanging out in the midst of our busy hospital treatment room during emergency hours a few of nights ago I was impressed at how much was going on all at once. On one treatment table was a pregnant Chihuahua experiencing difficulty passing her pups. On another table was a thirteen-year-old dog in a state of shock after trauma inflicted by other dogs in the neighborhood. An anesthetized kitty with a urinary tract blockage was being tended to on a third table. Things got even busier when a receptionist entered the treatment room with two stray Rottweilers in tow. The woman who dropped them off said she found them in a local shopping center parking lot. Both Rotties were gorgeous with wonderfully sweet dispositions – their little stub-tailed hind ends wiggled frantically in response to our attention. Additionally, it was apparent that both dogs were profoundly pregnant.

We hoped these two girls just happened to have busted out of their yard- perhaps a gate had been left open. We envisioned an anxious family frantic to find their pregnant dogs. Our optimism quickly dissipated as we discovered no collars, no identification microchips, and no one searching to reclaim their lost dogs in spite of our efforts to let every local shelter, pound, and veterinary hospital know about our new charges. Looking back, it seemed a bit suspicious that the woman who dropped them off happened to have a crate in the back of her truck large enough to hold two large dogs.

We turned one of our visiting rooms into a whelping pen and over the course of three hours our two strays morphed into twelve as one of the dogs delivered 10 beautiful, healthy pups. Some of them looked like “mom”, others revealed that “dad” was something other than a Rottweiler. Mama was a natural- licking and cleaning- doing everything just right, including letting complete strangers cut umbilical cords, inspect puppies, change bedding, and take her out for potty breaks while telling her what a perfect princess she was. Thus far, mama number two has not yet whelped.

I find myself longing to know the names of these two dogs (thinking they would enjoy hearing them) and wondering if they are missing their favorite humans. Clearly, both had been well socialized and cared for with sleek shiny hair coats and substantial body weights. And why were they given up? Were all of these dogs simply victims of tough economic times? Perhaps the prospects of finding homes for so many nonpurebred pups was daunting. The good news is that these mothers found their way to a “birthing center” where they and their pups would be well cared for.

While we are awaiting the arrival of litter number two, plans are in the works to place moms and pups with one or two Rottweiler rescue organizations. The big-hearted people who run such rescue organizations (some are breed-specific, others are not) are intent on making sure that needy dogs get second chances. If interested in an adult Rottweiler (who will need to be spayed) or mixed breed pup, feel free to contact me via my website – www.speakingforspot.com.

Please visit www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. SPEAKING FOR SPOT is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Wishing you and your dog good health,

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine