Posts Tagged ‘empowered client’

Reasonable Expectations Part II: Access to “The Back” of the Hospital

September 4, 2010

This is the second part of an ongoing series describing how people are developing new expectations when it comes to veterinary care for their pets.  Part one can be found at www.speakingforspot.com/blog

Care to tag along next time your pet is whisked to “the back” of the veterinary clinic for an injection, a diagnostic test, or a nail trim? Perhaps you are curious about what actually goes on “back” there. Maybe you believe that your best buddy will feel more secure if you are present.  Whatever the reason, know that  if you desire to go where your pet goes and see what your pet sees, this is a perfectly reasonable expectation in most circumstances.   Your request might be denied if: 

-Your pet is better behaved without you there (all vets have experienced aggressive patients in the exam room who become gentle as lambs when separated from their humans).

-There is something going on that is private (for example, a grieving client) or too graphic for you to see (trust your vet on this one).

-Your dog or cat will be in an area of the hospital that is off limits to humans. For example, in my hospital, in order to avoid radiation exposure, no one other than the patient is allowed in the room where X-rays are taken.  Gentle sand bags are used for restraint along with mild sedation if needed.

– The staff is aware that you have a lot to say and no one will be able to get anything done because they will be too busy responding to your questions. 

Admittedly, some vets simply don’t like having clients tag along.  If your doc falls into this camp, some patient persuading on your part may be necessary.  Provide reassurances that you will be on your best behavior and remind him or her that large animal vets do practically all of their work in front of their clients.  I happen to love when my clients wish to accompany me into the bowels of the hospital.  In fact, I find myself inviting them to follow more often than they think to ask.  I prefer they get a first hand look at what I am doing and seeing, rather than simply listening to my after-the-fact verbal description.  Admittedly, I’m proud of my facility and feel great when clients see our bustling staff, content patients in clean, comfy cages, and state of the art diagnostic and patient monitoring equipment. 

Before my clients step foot beyond the exam room, I gently coach them on the art of being unobtrusive- avoiding instructing nurses on how to restrain their pet and asking a bazillion questions while I am performing a procedure.  I always reserve the right to send clients back to the exam room if I perceive that their anxiety level is becoming contagious, and I describe in advance what they will be seeing.  This deters some, which is a good thing- nothing like a fainting or vomiting client to get the day off to an exciting start! 

Have you ever accompanied your dog or cat to “the back” of the hospital?  Was it a good experience for you?  How about for your pet?

Now, here’s wishing you and your four-legged family members abundant good health!

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com  to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Reasonable Expectations

August 28, 2010

Never before, during my almost 30 years as a veterinarian, have I encountered such rapid and profound changes in client expectations. We’ve entered what I like to refer to as “The Age of the Empowered Client”. I’d love to believe that this is a result of so many people reading my book, Speaking for Spot. Alas, I must give credit where credit is due- namely, the worldwide web. Discuss a symptom with my clients and I’m no longer surprised when they pull out their printed list of the diseases Dr. Google feels might be responsible. Render a diagnosis and my client can surf the net to quickly find a plethora of others who have “been there, done that” and are willing to provide advice about how best to navigate any possible medical minefield.

Do I believe these changes in client expectations are a good thing? You betcha! As I convey in Speaking for Spot, my belief is that every animal needs an empowered, adept medical advocate by its side. Of course I want veterinarians to remain essential members of the health care team, but I love it when those at the other end of the leash (or monkey-wrenching their backs schlepping cat carriers) become the team captains!

Over the next several weeks I will write about several previously uncommon client expectations that are now becoming mainstream. They are reasonable expectations in that they ultimately serve what clients and veterinarians hold as common ground- namely, the best interest of the patient. Remember, change is not for everyone- not all veterinarians necessarily “embrace” these changing expectations. Some gentle patience and persistence on your part may be needed. If you find your vet isn’t willing to budge, for your pets’ sake, I encourage you to find a new teammate.

I’m going to describe my favorite client expectation first because, once this expectation is fulfilled, satisfaction of most others will naturally follow. So here we go.  It is perfectly reasonable for you to expect “relationship centered care” from your veterinarian. This is a style of communication in which your vet holds your opinions and feelings in high regard and enough time is allowed during the office visit to hear them. He or she recognizes the unique role your pet plays in your life and is a willing source of empathy and support. Rather than telling you what to do, vets who practice relationship centered care discuss the pros and cons of all options before making a recommendation. They believe in collaborative decision making. Compare this to “paternalistic care” in which the vet maintains an emotional distance and recommends only what they believe is best without consideration of the patient’s or client’s unique situation. There are no significant opportunities for discussion or collaboration.

Relationship centered care is not for everyone- some people truly prefer to be told what to do (certainly the way I feel when my car is in need of repair!). However, if you desire relationship centered care from your vet (or for that matter your own physician), please know that this is a completely reasonable expectation. How do you find a veterinarian who employs this style of communication? At the risk of tooting my own horn, the chapter called “Finding Dr. Wonderful and Your Mutt’s Mayo Clinic” in Speaking for Spot will tell you everything you need to know to fulfill this expectation.

Do you work with a vet who provides relationship centered care? What do you like about his or her communication style?

Now, here’s wishing you and your four-legged best friend abundant good health!

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com  to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.