Posts Tagged ‘complementary medicine’

AHVMA 2011 Pearls

September 18, 2011

I recently had the pleasure of lecturing on veterinarian/client communication skills at the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) annual conference. Dr. Doug Knueven, a holistic veterinarian (combines Eastern and Western medicine) in Beaver, Pennsylvania was the conference coordinator.  Much to my delight, Dr. Knueven has graciously offered to provide you with some pearls from the conference (thank you Doug!).  Take it away Dr. Knueven!

Before I give you the goods, I’d like to start with a little background. The AHVMA was founded in 1982 by a hand full of veterinarians who were interested in complementary medicine. It has grown to an organization that is almost 1,000 members strong. AHVMA members practice diverse therapies including acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, homeopathy, natural nutrition, massage therapy, energy medicine and much more. Most of us continue to practice Western medicine as well (we haven’t thrown the baby out with the bath water) using an integrative model of health care.

The AHVMA 2011 conference provided 122 hours of continuing education for veterinarians and veterinary technicians. Lectures spanned the range of therapies mentioned above as well as client communication (thanks Dr. Nancy!), integrative oncology, nervous system issues, emergency preparedness, and electromagnetic biophysics (Yikes!!). Most lectures applied to pets but we also had a stampede of information for vets who work on horses, cows, and goats.

Approximately 400 professionals attended. Most were AHVMA members but a fair number were conventional practitioners who were interested in learning more about some of our fascinating topics. Attendees came from as far away as Europe, Japan and Australia. Our lecturers had varying backgrounds and areas of expertise. We had several veterinary speakers who are board certified specialists.

So here are some pearls of wisdom from the AHVMA conference:

Dr. Greg Ogilvie, who specializes in both internal medicine and oncology, spoke about how diet influences cancer:

Cancer cells have a “sweet tooth.” Pets with cancer should be fed a low-starch diet.

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid can help prevent cancer, fight cancer, increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy, and decrease the side effects of chemotherapy. The best source of DHA (highest concentration of active ingredient) is from oils that come from algae.

Do not give your pet high doses of anti-oxidant vitamins A, C, and E concurrently with chemotherapy as they can interfere with the action of the drugs.

Dr. Mona Rosenberg is a conventional oncologist who works with holistic veterinarians to provide an integrative approach to treating cancer.

She turned me on to a great website for the Society for Integrative Oncology (www.integrativeonc.org). Although this group is meant for human patients, most of the basic concepts are equally true for pets.

Dr. Barbara Royal addressed pet diets.

She uses integrative therapies with zoo animals and found lessons for pets from problems encountered while working with wild animals kept in captivity. The bottom line is that zoo animals encountered health problems when their diets varied from what they would get in the wild. Mother Nature is not easily fooled. Many pets benefit by being fed diets with little to no heat processing since this is what they evolved eating.

Dr. Lea Strogdale, an internal medicine specialist discussed diseases common to cats.

It turns out that slow motion video reveals that cats are inefficient at drinking water. This is why some cats like to drink from faucets or fountains. This makes sense since cats evolved from desert creatures where puddles are scarce. Because they do not drink efficiently, cats are prone to chronic dehydration. The bottom line is that many of the chronic diseases we see in cats, such as urinary crystals, chronic kidney disease, and constipation, may be due to the dehydrating effects of dry cat foods.

Do not feed your cat dry food. Many cats benefit from high-moisture canned or raw diets.

To entice your cat to drink more water, keep the bowl topped off or use a very broad bowl so she does not bump her sensitive whiskers against the sides.

I hope you have found these holistic pearls helpful. One final note, if you would like to find a holistic veterinarian in your area, check out www.ahvma.org and click on the “find a holistic veterinarian” button.

Dr. Doug Knueven

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Now, Dr. Knueven will be happy to entertain your questions!

Best wishes for good health,

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year Award
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

The challenges of combining Eastern and Western medicine for your pets

June 6, 2011

Choosing a veterinarian who practices Western medicine (conventional medicine/allopathy) or one who practices Eastern medicine (alternative/complementary medicine) is fairly straightforward.  Successfully combining the best of both medical worlds however can be challenging.  Speaking for Spot fan, Carolyn recently sent me an email based on her experiences:

Hello Dr. Nancy! My question has to do with both holistic and conventional medicine for our dogs. I try to do everything as “green and natural” as possible for my dog: home-made food & treats, non-toxic cleaning products, natural materials in beds and toys … you get the idea. I think supplements and holistic treatments have their place and often are very valuable in maintaining health and even in treating illness. That said, I believe conventional veterinary medicine is valuable too. My conventional vet is great … but she does roll her eyes when I discuss a holistic approach. So how does one balance both therapy options for their dog? Are there any vets who practice both holistic and conventional veterinary medicine, that have a more diverse toolbox so to speak? I sort of feel that I have a foot in both camps and I’m not sure my dog is well served by one approach over the other.

Here’s how I responded to Carolyn. By the way Maggie, the insanely adorable cotton ball flying over the hedge in the accompanying photo is Carolyn’s lucky companion.

Hi Carolyn. How nice to hear from you. Please give Maggie a treat from me! You are correct.  It can be difficult to find a veterinarian who practices Western medicine and supports referral for complementary medicine, and vice versa.  Truthfully, it is difficult for a veterinarian to be extremely well versed in both disciplines (hard enough staying truly proficient in just one of them).  There are a few veterinarians who do a great job with both, but they are few and far between.  Western medicine is the discipline predominantly taught in veterinary schools throughout the United States.  Proficiency in complementary modalities including Chinese herbs, homeopathy, and acupuncture requires additional training and certification.

What can you do to avoid having your veterinarian roll his or her eyes at you? As you know, I am a big believer in picking and choosing your veterinarians wisely. Certainly, open-mindedness is an important trait in any doctor, whether providing service for us or for our beloved pets.  The “ideal vet” is happy to have you work with other veterinarians so that your pets receive the care that is best for your peace of mind.  Just as most of us have a number of doctors for our health needs, it’s perfectly acceptable for your pets to have different doctors for their different health care needs.  Here is an example. The surgical specialists I work with frequently treat dogs suffering from severe arthritis pain.  In addition to prescribing a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medication and joint care supplements the surgeon may refer their patient to a rehabilitation therapy specialist for workouts on the underwater treadmill.  Clients are also offered the option of consulting with a veterinarian who specializes in acupuncture. The key to success is that all three specialists are open-minded, communicate with one another, and share a common goal- namely what is best for the patient. Can such a winning combination be found in every community? No, unfortunately not, but you won’t know until you look.  What should you do if your veterinarian feigns hurt feelings or rolls her eyes?  Stay true to your goals.  You know what is best for your pet.  Besides, which is more important, your vet’s feelings or your pet’s health?

Have you been successful at combining Eastern and Western medical approaches for your pets?  Do tell!

Best wishes for good health,

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of  Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year Award
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

 

 

An Herbal Addendum and Vital Information About Vitamins

March 1, 2010

My most recent blog focused on potential pitfalls associated with treating our pets with medicinal herbs.  As so commonly happens, I received wonderful feedback, and one comment in particular, I would like to share with you.  Dr. Susan Wynn, a much-admired veterinary colleague offered this sage advice, “I think your conclusion is appropriate – if you’re interested in herbs, talk to your vet.  I think you need to go one further, though, since most veterinarians know little about herbs – find a veterinarian who has a special interest in herbal medicine.  Not only are they more aware of interactions and toxicity, recent research and clinical experience, they also take great care to source their products from American companies, some of them organic, that employ knowledgeable formulators. About the PDR recommendation – that will not be as helpful as it is for people only.  Please see Veterinary Herbal Medicine (Elsevier, 2007).  Disclaimer – I’m the first author on it – but it was written to collect the most comprehensive available information on herbs and their use in domestic animals.  There are thousands of references, detailed information on over 100 herbs including known toxicity and interactions, species specific cautions, traditional ethnoveterinary uses and scientific support.”  

Just as many people are giving their herbs to their pets without veterinary supervision, so too are they providing them with supplemental vitamins.  I wish I could tell you that vitamins are perfectly safe to give.  Alas such is not the case and here is why.    Vitamins come in two basic varieties; they are either water soluble or fat soluble. Vitamins B and C are water soluble meaning that any excess in the body is readily eliminated from the body within the urine.  I certainly take an abundance of vitamin C when I feel a cold coming on (thanks to Linus Pauling) with no worries of an overdose.  Not true for vitamins A, D, E, and K.  These are fat soluble vitamins, meaning amounts above and beyond what the body needs cannot be readily eliminated. Rather, the excess is retained within the body’s fat stores which can result in hypervitaminosis (symptoms caused by a vitamin overdose).  For example, too much vitamin A can cause horrendous bony abnormalities and too much vitamin D can wreak havoc on normal calcium metabolism resulting in muscle tremors, gastrointestinal issues, and even kidney failure. 

What’s the bottom line?  As tempting as it is to believe that over the counter herbs and vitamins are safe for any and all living beings, take the time to discuss these products with a trusted veterinarian before you provide them to your beloved pets.

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health,

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Medicinal Herbs: Not to Be Taken (or Given) Lightly

February 23, 2010

As a small animal internist, the majority of my patients are referred by their family veterinarians.  By the time I first examine them, they are usually receiving a laundry list of conventional medications (antibiotics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, etc.) and/or complementary medications (herbs, homeopathic remedies).   I’ve always scrutinized the conventional medications on the list because their potential side effects and the ways they might impact my diagnostic and therapeutic planning.  I’ve tended to pay far less attention to the complementary medications because of my impression that these medicinals are unlikely to cause significant harm or interact unfavorably with other things I might prescribe. Well, there will be no more of this “ignorant bliss” for me! Not after reading, “A Review of the Potential Forensic Significance of Traditional Herbal Medicines” from the Journal of Forensic Science (January, 2010).  The author, Roger Byard, M.D. undertook a review of herbal medicines based on their increasing popularity (there has been a steady 10% increase in spending on botanical remedies in the United States) and the fact that access to such products is largely unrestricted- they can be purchased without prescription. Keep in mind that herbs are manufactured and sold without any FDA approval process.

Here are some of Dr. Byard’s comments and findings:

-An analysis of 251 Asian herbal products from stores in California identified arsenic in 36, mercury in 35, and lead in 24. There have been reports of lead poisoning and mercury poisoning in people caused by such contamination.
-Less expensive herbs are sometimes intentionally used to replace those that are more costly. A case is referenced in which an herb designed to promote weight loss was replaced with another. The unfortunate result for the patient was kidney failure.
-Accidental substitution can occur if plants are incorrectly identified or if the name is misinterpreted. Apparently, some traditional herbal preparations have multiple names. To make matters even more confusing, some herbal preparations that are different from one another go by the same name.
– Failure to process fresh herbs correctly can have serious consequences. Processing is designed to clean and preserve the desired material while removing or reducing any unwanted toxic components. The example provided was aconite root, a plant that must be soaked in water and boiled to reduce toxicity. Failure to do this can result in heart rhythm abnormalities and/or heart failure.
-Some herb manufacturers purposefully adulterate their products with drugs presumably to increase their efficacy. Yet no mention of this is made on the packaging. Examples of hidden products found in herbal preparations have included conventional medications to treat pain, inflammation, seizures, heart failure, and asthma.
-Herbal medicines can interact with conventional drugs and other herbs to cause undesirable side effects. For example, St. John’s Wort can decrease the blood level of some medications by impacting how they are metabolized within the liver.
-The American Society of Anesthesiologists has recommended discontinuation of herbal medicines at least two weeks prior to surgery because of their potential for causing complications. Although only eight herbs were identified as being potentially dangerous, they accounted for 50% of all single herb preparations of those sold within the United States. For example, Ginkgo has the potential to increase the risk of hemorrhage and Valerian can exacerbate the sedative effects of anesthetic agents.

Although Dr. Byard’s review is based on findings in human medicine, I have to believe that the general points he makes likely apply to veterinary medicine as well. His review has certainly served as a wake up call for me. If you use herbs, for your pets or yourself, perhaps this information will prompt you to think about things a bit differently as well. What is a practical approach for avoiding the potential pitfalls associated with herbal medications? I encourage you to consider doing the following:

  1. If you are giving herbs to your pet based on your own initiative, schedule an appointment with your vet to discuss and verify that what you are doing is reasonable and safe.
  2. Have a look at the blog I posted in July, 2009 (http://speakingforspot.com/blog/?p=407) called, “The Lowdown on Nutritional Supplements.” It will teach you how to use the ACCLAIM system to evaluate the quality of herbal products.
  3. Pick up a copy of the Physician’s Desk Reference (PDR) for Nonprescription Drugs, Dietary Supplements, and Herbs. It provides information about the indications, contraindications, and warnings for all commonly used herbs. This PDR is readily available via major online book vendors. I will certainly be using my own copy a whole lot more than ever before!

I hope I have not created fear or anxiety by presenting this information. Rather, my goal is to help you become the very best medical advocate possible. Now, like me, you know that herbal medications should not be taken (or given) lightly. If you provide herbs to your pet(s), I would love to hear from you. Please let me know which one(s) you are giving and whether you or your veterinarian initiated this treatment.

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health.

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller. 

 

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