Posts Tagged ‘abandoned pets’

WorldVets Paws for Japan

March 17, 2011

Animals in need after the Japan earthquake and tsunami

   

I hope you will join me in supporting World Vets (www.worldvets.org), a world class organization doing fabulous and important work for animals all over the world.   

   

    

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook     

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

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A Rottweiler Reunion

March 28, 2010

If you’ve been following my blog for some time, you may remember a series of stories I posted about two pregnant Rottweilers that were abandoned at my veterinary hospital (www.speakingforspot.com/blog 2/20/09, 3/8/09, 3/17/09).  In fact, these girls were so darned pregnant that, within 24 hours, one of them, now named Mia, delivered ten healthy, happy puppies.  Mia and her little sausages were fostered by Jill, a member of the amazing team of receptionists at my hospital.   Jill ended up keeping the runt of the litter, now known as Dodger, and she managed to find wonderful homes for Mia and the other nine pups. Candy, the other mama, found her way to Linda, a Rottweiler maven who works tirelessly doing Rottie rescue work.  Candy delivered five pups while in Linda’s care.  Mama and all five pups were placed in caring homes.  

   

  

  

Jill has managed to keep tabs on Mia and all but one her puppies.  As the adoptive families report, they are all matches made in heaven!  At their recent one-year birthday reunion (held at a local dog park) the puppies were all playing while their humans were sporting grins from ear to ear!  Although there were thirty or so dogs at the park that day, the siblings seemed to hang out preferentially with one another.  Have a look at the “before” and “after” photos.  In the adult photos, there are clearly two distinct facial appearances. (Perhaps two different dads were involved in the creation of this litter!) Charlie, Bandit, and Giovani have kept their original names.  Abby, Delilah, Ember, Freda, Hans, Ivan, and Juno have become Maggie, Dee Dee, Dodger, Ava, Trixie, Bruno, and Sadie.    

Dodger is the dog furthest to the right in this photo

  

Those little sausages have all turned into massive dogs with weights varying from 80 to 110 pounds.  And guess who the 110 pounder is!  None other than Dodger, the original runt of the litter!  

I hope this blog makes you smile and reminds you to support your local animal rescue organizations.  

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health,  

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook  

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.  

A Rottweiler Reunion

March 27, 2010

If you’ve been following my blog for some time, you may remember a series of stories I posted about two pregnant Rottweilers that were abandoned at my veterinary hospital (www.speakingforspot.com/blog 2/20/09, 3/8/09, 3/17/09).  In fact, these girls were so darned pregnant that, within 24 hours, one of them, now named Mia, delivered ten healthy, happy puppies.  Mia and her little sausages were fostered by Jill, a member of the amazing team of receptionists at my hospital.   Jill ended up keeping the runt of the litter, now known as Dodger, and she managed to find wonderful homes for Mia and the other nine pups. Candy, the other mama, found her way to Linda, a Rottweiler maven who works tirelessly doing Rottie rescue work.  Candy delivered five pups while in Linda’s care.  Mama and all five pups were placed in caring homes. 

  

 

 

Jill has managed to keep tabs on Mia and all but one her puppies.  As the adoptive families report, they are all matches made in heaven!  At their recent one-year birthday reunion (held at a local dog park) the puppies were all playing while their humans were sporting grins from ear to ear!  Although there were thirty or so dogs at the park that day, the siblings seemed to hang out preferentially with one another.  Have a look at the “before” and “after” photos.  In the adult photos, there are clearly two distinct facial appearances. (Perhaps two different dads were involved in the creation of this litter!) Charlie, Bandit, and Giovani have kept their original names.  Abby, Delilah, Ember, Freda, Hans, Ivan, and Juno have become Maggie, Dee Dee, Dodger, Ava, Trixie, Bruno, and Sadie.   

Dodger is the dog furthest to the right in this photo

Those little sausages have all turned into massive dogs with weights varying from 80 to 110 pounds.  And guess who the 110 pounder is!  None other than Dodger, the original runt of the litter! 

I hope this blog makes you smile and reminds you to support your local animal rescue organizations. 

Best wishes to you and your four-legged family members for abundant good health, 

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life

Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook 

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Magic!

March 17, 2009

Magic was an incredibly smart and affectionate Rottweiler mix lovingly cared for by Matt, Shannon and their two children.  Her final years were a challenge because of diabetes and blindness.  When the quality of Magic’s life dramatically diminished and there was no hope for improvement, Matt and Shannon opted for euthanasia. Magic passed away peacefully at my hospital while lying on her favorite blue and white checkered blanket, surrounded by her doting human family members. 

 

That was just a few months ago.  When I’ve spoken with Matt and Shannon since, it has been clear that Magic’s absence has created a huge void. They and their children are all experiencing and working through their grief a little bit differently. Not surprisingly they’ve had some debates about when to consider adopting another dog.  The kids are clearly ready- Matt and Shannon haven’t been so sure, that is until they received my email about two abandoned Rottweiler mamas and their 15 mixed breed puppies (see previous blog posts at http://www.speakingforspot.com), The photos that accompanied my description of the dogs were utterly compelling to them. Not only did the appearance of the mother remind them of their Magic, the blanket she and her pups were lying on happened to be the exact same blue and white checkered blanket they’d left at my hospital with their beloved girl (keep in mind, we have literally hundreds of blankets to choose from in our hospital)!

 

Needless to say, a quick family conference determined that a puppy visit was in order.  Now Matt, Shannon, and their kids have only a few more weeks to wait before Charlie- a plump little female with German Shepherd type markings- becomes part of their family.   What a lucky puppy!

 

Some refer to such interesting life events as synchronicity.  Deepak Chopra would likely refer to this story as a “divine coincidence.”  I prefer to think of it as Magic!

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Please visit www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. SPEAKING FOR SPOT is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.  
 

Wishing you and your dog good health,

 

Dr. Nancy Kay

Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

Look for us on Twitterhttp://twitter.com/speakingforspot

 

Mia, Candy, and Fifteen Puppies

March 8, 2009

It has now been two weeks since two pregnant Rottweilers were abandoned at my hospital (read Victims Come in All Sizes at Spot’s blog: speakingforspot.wordpress.com).  My blog post about these two girls generated so much interest about their welfare, I feel the need to provide an update.

 

Within days of having their lives turned upside down, one of the Rottweilers (now named Mia) gave birth to ten plump, vigorous, hungry puppies- six girls and four boys.  She and her pups are receiving foster care and living the good life with Jill (one of our hospital receptionists) and her family. Jill tells me that this has been an incredible and wonderful experience for her family.  They have fallen in love with Mia (they may have trouble letting her go) and watching the puppies change day by day has been extraordinary.  Mia is the “model mom,” nurturing her pups and welcoming the companionship of her new human family. The pups have just opened their eyes and are quickly developing different personalities.  Some are calm and unobtrusive while others have become pushy, persistently demanding their mama’s attention and pushing others out of the way to get it.  The pups are named (at least temporarily) Abby, Bandit, Charli, Delilah, Ember, Freda, Giovani, Hans, Ivan, and Juno.  A few look like Rottweilers- the others clearly have mixed breed markings.  To date, six of Mia’s pups are spoken for.

 

Candy and her puppies have found a safe haven with Rottweiler maven, Linda.  Like so many others who tirelessly invest their time and money into dog rescue work, Linda opens her home and heart to Rottweilers (or Rottweiler mixed breeds) who have experienced misfortune.  Linda reports that, in the course of adapting to so many changes, Candy’s somewhat timid demeanor is giving way to a more animated, tail-wagging personality. Like Mia, Candy is also a wonderful mother.  To date, none of her pups are spoken for.  There are three boys and two girls.

 

I continue to ponder what life must have been like for Mia and Candy before I met them and why the person who cared for them felt the need to make such a drastic life-changing decision.  What I do know is that, from here on out, life is bound to be wonderful for these two gorgeous mothers and their fifteen babies.  If you have interest in adopting a Rottweiler mix pup (they’ll be ready to leave the nest in approximately 5 weeks), please contact me at dr.kay@speakingforspot.com.

 

 

Please visit www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. SPEAKING FOR SPOT is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Wishing you and your dog good health,
Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Look for us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/speakingforspot

 

Victims Come in All Sizes

February 20, 2009

As I was hanging out in the midst of our busy hospital treatment room during emergency hours a few of nights ago I was impressed at how much was going on all at once. On one treatment table was a pregnant Chihuahua experiencing difficulty passing her pups. On another table was a thirteen-year-old dog in a state of shock after trauma inflicted by other dogs in the neighborhood. An anesthetized kitty with a urinary tract blockage was being tended to on a third table. Things got even busier when a receptionist entered the treatment room with two stray Rottweilers in tow. The woman who dropped them off said she found them in a local shopping center parking lot. Both Rotties were gorgeous with wonderfully sweet dispositions – their little stub-tailed hind ends wiggled frantically in response to our attention. Additionally, it was apparent that both dogs were profoundly pregnant.

We hoped these two girls just happened to have busted out of their yard- perhaps a gate had been left open. We envisioned an anxious family frantic to find their pregnant dogs. Our optimism quickly dissipated as we discovered no collars, no identification microchips, and no one searching to reclaim their lost dogs in spite of our efforts to let every local shelter, pound, and veterinary hospital know about our new charges. Looking back, it seemed a bit suspicious that the woman who dropped them off happened to have a crate in the back of her truck large enough to hold two large dogs.

We turned one of our visiting rooms into a whelping pen and over the course of three hours our two strays morphed into twelve as one of the dogs delivered 10 beautiful, healthy pups. Some of them looked like “mom”, others revealed that “dad” was something other than a Rottweiler. Mama was a natural- licking and cleaning- doing everything just right, including letting complete strangers cut umbilical cords, inspect puppies, change bedding, and take her out for potty breaks while telling her what a perfect princess she was. Thus far, mama number two has not yet whelped.

I find myself longing to know the names of these two dogs (thinking they would enjoy hearing them) and wondering if they are missing their favorite humans. Clearly, both had been well socialized and cared for with sleek shiny hair coats and substantial body weights. And why were they given up? Were all of these dogs simply victims of tough economic times? Perhaps the prospects of finding homes for so many nonpurebred pups was daunting. The good news is that these mothers found their way to a “birthing center” where they and their pups would be well cared for.

While we are awaiting the arrival of litter number two, plans are in the works to place moms and pups with one or two Rottweiler rescue organizations. The big-hearted people who run such rescue organizations (some are breed-specific, others are not) are intent on making sure that needy dogs get second chances. If interested in an adult Rottweiler (who will need to be spayed) or mixed breed pup, feel free to contact me via my website – www.speakingforspot.com.

Please visit www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot. There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. SPEAKING FOR SPOT is available at Amazon.com, local bookstores, or your favorite online book seller.

Wishing you and your dog good health,

Dr. Nancy Kay
Specialist, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine